Frankston Senior School Course Selection Handbook 2023

TOGETHER WE BECOME PURPOSEFUL LEARNERS SENIOR SCHOOL Course Selection Handbook 2023

2 FRANKSTON H I GH SCHOOL Principal’s Welcome Dear Parents/Carers and Students, Welcome to the Senior Years at Frankston High School. The last two years of secondary school education are of critical importance as our young people choose subjects that reflect their passions and strengths and are prerequisites for further post school learning including courses in the tertiary sector and apprenticeship pathways. The Victorian Government is reforming senior secondary schooling to provide students with greater choice, confidence and skills for their future career. At Frankston High School we are implementing these changes from 2023 and will continue to provide a great breadth of subject and pathway choices to support the diverse range of student interests across our school. We offer both the VCE and the new VCE-Vocational Major Certificates. The VCE-Vocational Major Certificate is an applied learning program that will support students to develop academic and practical skills, knowledge, confidence and agency needed to prepare for the world of work and further education and training. Our students will have the opportunity to choose from a myriad of VCE and VET subjects as well as being able to participate in the new VCE-Vocational Major Certificate and/or our structured workplace learning recognition program. This handbook is an essential resource in supporting students and their families in the course counselling process. We ensure trained course counsellors meet with Year 10 students and their families to ensure each student is well informed when making certificate and subject choices. Our advice is for students to select subjects they have a passion for and also any subjects that are prerequisites for particular career pathways they are interested in pursuing. If choices are made with these criteria in mind, then students are more likely to discover career pathways that are very rewarding. As you would be aware, Frankston High School has a very proud history of supporting students in achieving excellent learning outcomes. We know from research studies that students who graduate from Year 12 and proceed onwards with further learning are more likely to have more prosperous lives compared to students who graduate and enter into employment without any further learning opportunities. We are committed to supporting every student to qualify for further learning pathways that are aligned with their aspirations and which will ultimately allow them to achieve their dreams. I hope you find this handbook useful as you navigate through the final years of secondary school. Please be assured that our staff will assist you throughout this important time in making the best choices for the future. Best wishes Andrew Batchelor Principal

SEN I OR SCHOOL HANDBOOK 3 Contents Principal’s Welcome 2 Introduction 4 Key Contact List 4 PART 1: Course Selection Planning Tool Course Selection Planning Tool - Step 1 7 Course Selection Planning Tool - Step 2 7 Course Selection Planning Tool - Step 3 9 PART 2: VCE WHAT IS THE VCE? 13 VCE Assessment 13 ATAR - VCE Program 14 Non-ATAR - VCE Program 14 Calculating the ATAR 14 Important Considerations about ATARs & Scaling 15 VCE SUBJECT AND VCE VET LIST 16 VCE SUBJECTS THE ARTS VCE Art Creative Practice 20 VCE Drama 24 VCE Media 26 VCE Music 28 VCE Visual Communication Design 32 ENGLISH VCE English 36 VCE English as an Additional Language (EAL) 40 VCE Literature 44 HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION VCE Health & Human Development 48 VCE Outdoor and Environmental Education 50 VCE Physical Education 52 VCE VET Sport and Recreation 54 HUMANITIES AND BUSINESS VCE Accounting 56 VCE Business Management 58 VCE Geography 60 VCE History: Modern History 62 VCE History: Revolutions (Russian & Chinese Revolutions) 64 VCE Legal Studies 66 VCE Philosophy 68 LANGUAGES Languages 72 VCE Languages: French 73 VCE Language: Japanese Second Language 76 MATHEMATICS VCE Mathematics 80 VCE Foundation Mathematics 82 VCE General Mathematics 84 VCE Mathematical Methods 86 VCE Specialist Mathematics 88 SCIENCE VCE Biology 92 VCE Chemistry 95 VCE Environmental Science 98 VCE Physics 100 VCE Psychology 103 VCE STRUCTURED WORKPLACE LEARNING Structured Workplace Learning Recognition - SWLR 106 TECHNOLOGY VCE Food Studies 109 Information Technology: VCE Computing 113 Information Technology: VCE Informatics 114 Information Technology: VCE Software Development 116 VCE Product Design and Technology 117 PART 3: VCE - Vocational Major VCE Vocational Major (VCE-VM) 119 Why has the Department of Education decided to implement the VCE - Vocational Major (VCE-VM)? 119 What’s changing? VCAL to VCE - Vocational Major 120 The VCAA eligibility requirements for the VCE-VM 120 Assessment in the VCE - Vocational Major 120 What will the VCE - Vocational Major look like at Frankston High School? 121 Who is the VCE - Vocational Major for? 121 What is VCE - Vocational Major Structured Workplace Learning? 122 VET in the VCE - Vocational Major 122 Selection process for current Year 10 students seeking a place in the VCE - Vocational Major program for 2023 122 Student Checklist 123 Applied learning in the VCE - Vocational Major Certificate 123 VCE VOCATIONAL MAJOR SUBJECTS VCE - Vocational Major Literacy 124 VCE - Vocational Major Numeracy 128 VCE - Vocational Major Work Related Skills (WRS) 132 VCE - Vocational Major Personal Development Skills (PDS) 136 PART 4: Vocational Education & Training (VET) Why choose VET? 142 How does VET contribute to the VCE and the VCE - Vocational Major? 142 What you need to know about VET? 142 VCE VET Subject Advice 143 Get VET 143 VET Certificate Subject List 144

4 FRANKSTON H I GH SCHOOL Introduction This handbook contains information about the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) and the VCEVocational Major (VCE-VM) for students enrolled at Frankston High School. Frankston High School also offers a comprehensive range of Vocational Education and Training (VET) units. This handbook should be used by students to help them plan their pathway through the senior school by selecting a program and subjects that lead to their intended career and post school destination. In selecting their senior years program, students will be provided with course counselling from within the school to assist them in making these important decisions. It is also very important that students take control and undertake their own research to ensure that they are making the best choices for them. Senior School Highlights • Two year course of study • Excellent teachers • Exceptional learning environment and facilities • High achieving school with excellent VCE results • iSupport Program to support students, emotionally and academically through their senior school years • Structured Workplace Learning available in VCE and VCE - Vocational Major • A diverse range of VET subjects are available • Opportunities to participate in careers education and counselling • Extra curricula opportunities in sport, student leadership and our school production Key Contact List Frankston High School has a leadership team that oversees all aspects of the Senior School. The structure of the group is: Ms Helen Wilson Campus Principal - Senior Campus Ms Carla Caminiti Director of Student Management and Engagement: Year Level 12 Ms Ellen D’Ambra Director of Student Management and Engagement: Year Level 11 Ms Kelly Mitchell Assistant Year 12 Coordinator Mr Paul Don Assistant Year 11 Coordinator Mrs Sharon Bourne Careers Coordinator Mrs Carolyn McIver VET Coordinator Ms Tina Thomas Senior School Office Manager

SEN I OR SCHOOL HANDBOOK 5 CONTENTS

PART 1 COURSE SELECTION PLANNING TOOL 6 FRANKSTON H I GH SCHOOL COURSE SELECTION PLANNING TOOL All students must complete this Course Selection Planning Tool prior to their course counselling interview. Students are encouraged to complete their Career Action Plan, which is located on Compass under the Insight tab, prior to participating in their course counselling interview.

PART 1 COURSE SELECTION PLANNING TOOL SEN I OR SCHOOL HANDBOOK 7 Course Selection Planning Tool - Step 1 Making decisions about what to study in Year 11 and 12 – and beyond – involves reflecting on what you have already experienced. It involves considering what you might like to experience in the future. Students are encouraged to revisit their Morrisby Vocational Report to reflect upon their career ideas and connect these with their subject choices. Students can re-do the Self-Interest part of the Morrisby Vocational Assessment tool to support them in exploring their career ideas. Year 10 students have been supported to complete a series of career exploration activities to guide them in their subject choices prior to attending their course counselling appointment. Students can also visit the Frankston High School Careers website, register in the student area and complete a series of career quizzes to help them to reflect upon their strengths and interests and connect these with possible subject choices. There are a number of excellent career management resources available to all students on our careers website (www.fhscareers.com). All of course counselling materials will be available, once released, on our careers website under the IMPORTANT INFORMATION tab for ease of use. Course Selection Planning Tool - Step 2 Please read this advice prior to selecting your 2023 program and subjects. Year 11 and 12 Options Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) VCE Vocational Major (VM) ▼ ▼ Apprenticeships, traineeships, VET, university (ATAR) or work Apprenticeships, traineeships, VET, university (through alternative entry programs) or work General advice for selecting your senior program Time to select a program and subjects for 2023. Choosing studies When choosing studies think about what interests you and what you are good at. Check out the studies Frankston High School offers. If you are in Year 10 and Year 11, you now have the choice between a VCE or a VCE-VM program. To find out what each program is, read the VCE and the VCE - Vocational Major sections in this handbook. Stuck? Consider a broad program If you have no idea which studies you want to take up in two years, don’t panic! Keep your VCE study program broad with studies across the areas you are interested in and are good at. You may also find that a VCE - Vocational Major program might provide you with the vocational education program you would most enjoy. To find out what each program is, check out the VCE and the VCE - Vocational Major sections in this handbook. How not to choose studies Don’t choose studies if you don’t like them or aren’t good at them. Choosing studies simply because of how they were scaled doesn’t guarantee you a ‘good’ ATAR. If you perform well in all of your studies, you will increase your chance of getting a ‘good’ ATAR regardless of whether or not the studies are traditionally scaled up or down. Quick tips Keep in mind, the decisions you make about your studies now are important, but they’re not the only chance you’ll have to choose or change your future study and career options. There are many avenues to tertiary study and the career you want. It doesn’t hurt, however, to do some investigation and planning so that you give yourself the best opportunity to be happy with your choices in the long run. CONTENTS

PART 1 COURSE SELECTION PLANNING TOOL 8 FRANKSTON H I GH SCHOOL Some university and TAFE courses require prerequisites too! In Year 10 it’s important to get an idea of the kinds of tertiary courses available and to research eligibility and application requirements. This includes the type of Year 12 qualification required and the prerequisite studies you must complete to be eligible for selection. In Year 11 it’s important to confirm the prerequisite studies set for your preferred tertiary course/s. Prerequisites are VCE studies you must have completed to be eligible for selection into a course. Prerequisites set the knowledge and skills you need to understand a course’s content. If you haven’t completed the required prerequisites (or equivalent) for a course, you won’t be selected. This is why it is important to look ahead to what you might want to study after school, before selecting your Year 11 and 12 subjects. Prerequisites are set two years in advance so that Year 10 students know what prerequisite studies are needed for courses commencing the year after they complete school. Year 11 students should also consult the prerequisite list again to confirm their subjects ensure their eligibility to apply for specific tertiary degrees. • Prerequisites for tertiary study in 2024 are at: https://www.vtac.edu.au/files/pdf/publications/prerequisites_for_2024.pdf • Prerequisites for tertiary study in 2025 are not yet available. Please check VTAC for 2025 Prerequisites (www.vtac.edu.au) in July. • All of the VTAC prerequisite guides will be uploaded to the Frankston High School Careers Website when available (https://www.fhscareers.com/). • Students can also visit the VTAC website and enter their preferred course into the VTAC Prerequisite and Course Explorer which can be found at: https://delta.vtac.edu.au/CourseSearch/prerequisiteplanner.htm Students can complete a prerequisite search in two ways on this VTAC tool. Students can enter their entire program using the I want to use my whole VCE study program to see which courses I am eligible for option OR students can undertake a single subject prerequisite search by using the I want to enter a single VCE subject to see which courses require it. This is a very easy tool to use and we recommend you use it to help you research the range of tertiary courses available to you. Things to know about prerequisites • Prerequisites can change from year to year and are published two years in advance. Make sure you look up the prerequisites for the year you want to apply to a course. • Be aware, prerequisites can differ between similar sounding courses. • Minimum study scores for prerequisites are your VCE study score, not your scaled study score. • If you fail to meet a prerequisite, talk to the institution about pathways into the course that allow you to complete the prerequisites (or equivalent). You may need to commence a different course to pathway into your dream tertiary degree. This is very common and often provides students with a better understanding of the type of study required and of the jobs connected to this study. Quite often, students emerge with two qualifications and a whole lot of vocational experience by taking a pathway through TAFE, for example. Final advice for selecting subjects and a senior school program • Select studies that are based on interests, careers, further study and your strengths. • You should choose a course with the flexibility to enable you to vary your pathway if required. • The course should fulfill the requirements to successfully complete a two year program, ie., an ATAR or non-ATAR program or VCE-Vocational Major program. • Do not select subjects because of scaling. • Do not select subjects because your friends are doing them. Myths about scaling Many students believe that to achieve their best possible ATAR they need to choose studies which have been scaled up in previous years. This is not true and can work against you. Choosing a study that you are not very good at, or engaged in, simply because it may be scaled up would be a mistake. If you are concerned about your score, you need to be sure you are good at a study and that you are engaged in doing your best. It is most likely that a ‘scaled down’ score in a study you performed well in will be higher than a ‘scaled up’ study in which you didn’t.

PART 1 COURSE SELECTION PLANNING TOOL SEN I OR SCHOOL HANDBOOK 9 Course Selection Planning Tool - Step 3 After you have read the information provided in this handbook you need to complete the following course plan for your VCE program. VCE subjects are listed in the VCE section & VET subjects are listed in Part 4: Vocational Education and Training (VET) section in this handbook. VCE Two Year Course Map You must fill in your two-year plan. For example, if you are in Year 11 you need to note down your current study program and your proposed Year 12 program. If you are in Year 10, you need to note down your Year 11 and Year 12 subjects. As a general rule, students drop one of their Year 11 subjects and proceed into Year 12 with 5 subjects. All VCE Year 11 students are required to select 5 VCE Year 12 subjects at this time. Career Goal Prerequisite Subject(s) VCE Year 11 students study 6 subjects. YEAR 11 Subject 1 Subject 2 Subject 3 Subject 4 Subject 5 Subject 6 Subjects are divided into two units. Unit 1 is completed during Semester 1 & Unit 2 is completed during Semester 2. English/EAL Back-up Subjects x 3 All VCE Year 12 students are required to select 5 subjects. YEAR 12 Subject 1 Subject 2 Subject 3 Subject 4 Subject 5 Back-up Subject Subjects are divided into two units. Unit 3 is completed during Semester 1 & Unit 4 is completed during Semester 2. English/EAL 1. 2. OR CONTENTS

PART 1 COURSE SELECTION PLANNING TOOL 10 FRANKSTON H I GH SCHOOL VCE Vocational Major (VCE - VM) Two Year Course Map Please Note: VCE Vocational Major graduates will NOT receive an ATAR. The VCE Vocational Major subjects are designed for students seeking a first post school pathway such as an apprenticeship, traineeship, a diploma, a certificate, entry to the police force or employment. VCE Vocational Major graduates are ineligible to apply directly to universities to enter their degree programs. Students may be able to pathway through vocational education qualifications (TAFE) and progress to university degrees in a number of discipline areas. Students should plan their pathway carefully and confirm that they do not require an ATAR or subject study scores prior to course selection if they are seeking tertiary study. Complete the chart below by identifying your preferred VET Certificate program/s and identify the type and possible location of the work placement you will seek prior to commencing your studies in 2023. Current 2022 Year 11 VCAL students can also use this chart to identify their preferred VET programs and work placement location. Career Goal VCE Vocational Major (VCE-VM) Year 11 Year 12 VCE-VM Unit 1 & 2 Literacy VCE-VM Unit 3 & 4 Literacy VCE-VM Unit 1 & 2 Numeracy VCE-VM Unit 3 & 4 Numeracy VCE-VM Unit 1 & 2 Personal Development Skills VCE-VM Unit 3 & 4 Personal Development Skills VCE-VM Unit 1 & 2 Work Related Skills VCE-VM Unit 3 & 4 Work Related Skills VET Unit 1 – SWL Recognition Your work placement needs to be related to your VET certificate. For example, if you are studying VET Automotive, you should be seeking a work placement with a mechanic. VET Unit 2 – SWL Recognition Your work placement needs to be related to your VET certificate. For example, if you are studying VET Automotive, you should be seeking a work placement with a mechanic. VET Unit Preference 1: ……………………………………………………… VET Unit Preference 2: ……………………………………………………… VET Unit: ……………………………………………………… VET is a nationally recognised qualification and it is not possible to change your VET during the calendar year, ie., you can not swap into another VET. Proposed Structured Workplace Learning Recognition Placement Type of placement you will seek List of possible contacts/ locations Tips for VCE and VCE - VM Students • Don’t leave subject selection to the last minute • Come to your course counselling appointment prepared • Do your own research • Select a program that will allow you to achieve success • Reflect honestly on yourself and on your preferred learning style • Consider different pathways to the career field you are interested in

PART 1 COURSE SELECTION PLANNING TOOL SEN I OR SCHOOL HANDBOOK 11 CONTENTS

PART 2 12 FRANKSTON H I GH SCHOOL VCE Please note: The VCE-Vocational Major program is outlined in Part 3 (page 119). The Structure of VCE at Frankston High School In Year 11, all Frankston High School students’ study six subjects, only one of which is compulsory and that is English/English as an Additional Language (EAL). In Year 12, all Frankston High School students’ study five subjects, only one of which is compulsory and that is English/English as an Additional Language (EAL). A subject at VCE level is divided up into four units. One Semester = One Unit. In the subject of English, for example…. YEAR 11 2023 Semester One English Unit 1 2023 Semester Two English Unit 2 YEAR 12 2024 Semester One English Unit 3 2024 Semester Two English Unit 4

PART 2 VCE SEN I OR SCHOOL HANDBOOK 13 What is the VCE? The Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) is a recognised course of study that provides pathways for students into employment, TAFE, and tertiary institutions. This handbook provides information to assist students in planning their pathway through the VCE. We encourage students to read the handbook carefully and use it to ask questions about the subjects in which they have an interest. To obtain a VCE, students must satisfactorily complete at least 16 units of study including: • Three units from the English curriculum area, with at least one Unit 3 & 4 sequence. • Three sequences of Unit 3 & 4 (or VET equivalent) other than English. Who should do VCE? • Students who are realistically seeking a university pathway should do their VCE. • Students who prefer to work independently. • Students who are committed to doing the required hours of regular homework and study (revision). • Students who are well equipped to devote the time and energy to the production of sustained written responses to prompts in all subjects. • Students who passionately conceptualise and produce folios reflecting their creativity. • Students who are prepared to challenge themselves and can comprehend abstract concepts. • Students who achieve satisfactory results in tests and exams and have demonstrated the capacity to prepare for their exams. • Students with excellent organisation and time management skills. • Students who are prepared to work intensively with their teachers, inside and outside of class. • Students who are prepared to devote a significant amount of time to their studies over school holiday periods and complete trial exams during the September school holidays. VCE Assessment Outcomes Every unit has learning outcomes that are obtained through a set of varied activities directly related to the areas of study. The classroom teacher (using a range of assessment methods) is responsible for assessing outcomes. • Units 1 & 2 in the VCE are graded differently from Units 3 & 4. • Students completing a Unit 1 & 2 subject will receive an overall mark of S (Satisfactory) or N (Not Satisfactory) for every unit they undertake. • For an ATAR - VCE students Unit 3 & 4 work is graded on a scale from A+ to E. These marks are used with the external exam results to calculate a study score, which is used to determine a student’s Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR). • Each unit of the VCE study has a number of learning outcomes that are assessed by tasks that are common to all students. • An N for any one of these gives the student an N for the unit for both ATAR (scored) and non-ATAR (unscored) VCE students. It is from the studies outcomes that satisfactory (S) or not satisfactory (N) completion of a unit is determined. Graded Assessment Tasks For students undertaking Units 1 & 2, there will be graded tasks in each unit. Students will also be required to sit a school based examination at the end of each unit. CONTENTS

PART 2 VCE 14 FRANKSTON H I GH SCHOOL ATAR - VCE Program There will be School Assessed Coursework and/or School Assessed Tasks (SAT) and Externally Assessed Tasks for each subject. In each unit there will be a combination of school assessed work and examinations that are assessed directly by the VCAA. Grades will be awarded on the scale A+, A, B+, B, C+, C, D+, D, E+, E, UG or NA. All marks and grades awarded by the school are conditional and may change as a result of statistical moderation conducted by the VCAA. Non-ATAR - VCE Program For students undertaking unscored Units 3 & 4 subjects there will be School Assessed Coursework (SAC) for each unit. • A number of subjects allow non-ATAR (unscored) students to use notes during School Assessed Coursework (SAC) tasks. • Students undertaking a non-ATAR VCE program do not complete the external examinations. • Students will not receive an ATAR at the end of the year. • Students need a minimum of four Unit 3 & 4 sequences, with one of the subjects being from the English group, to qualify for the award of VCE. • Students also need to pass a minimum of 16 Units over the two years to qualify for the award of VCE. Calculating the ATAR ATAR stands for Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank, so it is a rank – not a score. It is represented as a number between 0 and 99.95 in intervals of 0.05, with 99.95 being the highest rank. Because the ATAR is a rank, there is no pass or fail ATAR. Everyone who receives an ATAR has successfully passed the VCE. The ATAR simply demonstrates each student’s achievement in relation to all other students in the Year 12 age group. Someone receiving an ATAR of 55, for example, has performed better than 55 per cent of the Year 12 age group that year. Subjects aren’t scaled because of how ‘hard’ or how ‘easy’ we think they are. In reality, every subject is scaled in the same way: based on the strength of the competition in a particular year. VCE Study Scores are standardised rankings, or relative positions, reported on a scale between 0 and 50, with a middle ranking of 30. So, a student with a Study Score of 30 has performed better than half the students in that subject for that year. Scaling is applied to determine the difficulty in achieving the middle ranking – the median study score of 30 – in each subject. Take Economics as an example. To scale this subject, VTAC looks at all of the students who took Economics this year and calculates the average of each of these students, across all of their other VCE studies. Where the average study score of a subject is above the mean (30), then the study is scaled up, because it shows that those students performed above average overall, meaning that there was higher competition in Economics – it was harder to get that middle score of 30. If Economics students performed below average in all of their other studies, then Economics would scale down, because that shows us that there was less competition in Economics this year. An ATAR aggregate is calculated by adding: • the scaled study score in any one of the English studies, plus • the scaled study scores of the student’s next best three permissible studies, plus • 10 per cent of the scaled study score for a fifth study (where available), plus • 10 per cent of the scaled study score for a sixth study (where available).

PART 2 VCE SEN I OR SCHOOL HANDBOOK 15 For example, STUDY STUDY SCORE SCALED STUDY SCORE AGGREGATE CONTRIBUTION English 31 28.79 28.79 Further Mathematics 41 40.00 40.00 Business Management 40 38.00 38.00 Health and Human Development 40 37.15 37.15 Psychology 35 33.00 3.30 Visual Communication Design 35 31.00 3.10 AGGREGATE 150.34 Aggregate converted to an ATAR 85.85 The aggregate will be converted into a ranking of between 0 and 99.95 (the ATAR). Important Considerations about ATARs and Scaling When choosing subjects for next year it is important that students do not choose to study particular subjects because they think doing those studies will help them get a higher ATAR. An ATAR represents a student’s performance across all of their studies and they are more likely to do well at subjects they enjoy. It is also important that students do not choose to study a subject based on scaling. There is no point in a student selecting a study that they struggle with simply because it has traditionally been scaled up. Scaling is dependent on the performance of the students studying in a particular year. Therefore, it can change year to year. Some subjects require a student to study the Unit 1 and Unit 2 sequence prior to undertaking the Unit 3 and Unit 4 sequence. This is strongly recommended by VCAA and the list of VCE subjects provides details on VCE subjects. Some subjects are only available at the Unit 1 and Unit 2 level, therefore valuable for vocational purposes but not providing a pathway to a Unit 3 or Unit 4 sequence and consequent Study Score. Many Frankston High School students have already begun their VCE journey by undertaking a Unit 1 and Unit 2 sequence of a study whilst in Year 10. *It is very important to note that ALL Year 10 students who wish to include a Year 12 Unit 3 and 4 subject in their Year 11 VCE program must submit an Expression of Interest Application form. This form can be found on Compass and needs to be submitted to the Senior School office on 14 June 2022 by 3.30pm. Students who want to study a Unit 3 and Unit 4 sequence in their Year 11 program but have not studied the Unit 1 and Unit 2 sequence must also apply. All applications are considered by a panel of senior educators at Frankston High School. Students will be notified of their application outcome just prior to the commencement of course counselling. *It is NOT compulsory to study a Year 12 Unit 3 and 4 subject in a VCE Year 11 program. CONTENTS

PART 2 16 FRANKSTON H I GH SCHOOL 2023 VCE Subject and VCE VET List Please Note: VET descriptions can be found in the Frankston High School VET (Vocational Education and Training) booklet which can be found on Compass - News Feed. SUBJECT DESCRIPTION VCE VET VCE Accounting This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ Acting (Screen) This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ Agriculture (Breeding & Caring of Animals) This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ Agriculture (Organic Produce & Horticulture) This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ Animal Studies (Domestic Pets) This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ Applied Fashion & Design This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Art Creative Practice ✕ Automotive – Mechanical This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ Aviation (Remote Pilot) ✕ Beauty Services This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Biology ✕ Building and Construction (Carpentry) - Partial Completion ONLY This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Business Management ✕ VCE Chemistry This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ Dance This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ Digital Games Creation This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Drama ✕ Early Childhood Education and Care - Partial Completion ONLY This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ Electrotechnology This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE English This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE & VET SUBJECT LIST

PART 2 SEN I OR SCHOOL HANDBOOK 17 SUBJECT DESCRIPTION VCE VET VCE English as an Additional Language (EAL) This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Environmental Science ✕ Equine Studies This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ Events Management This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Food Studies ✕ VCE Language French This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Geography ✕ Health Services Assistance This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Health and Human Development ✕ Integrated Technologies ✕ VCE Modern History This subject can only be studied at the Unit 1 and Unit 2 level. ✕ VCE History Revolutions This is a subject that can only be selected at the Unit 3 and Unit 4 level. ✕ VCE Information Technology - Computing This subject can only be studied at the Unit 1 and Unit 2 level. ✕ VCE Information Technology – Informatics This is a subject that can only be selected at the Unit 3 and Unit 4 level. ✕ VCE Information Technology – Software Development This is a subject that can only be selected at the Unit 3 and Unit 4 level. ✕ Interior Decoration (Retail) This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Language: Japanese Second Language This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ Kitchen Operations – General Cooking/ Chef This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Languages other than English This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Legal Studies ✕ Legal Services ✕ VCE Literature ✕ VCE Foundation Mathematics This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE General Mathematics This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE & VET SUBJECT LIST CONTENTS

PART 2 18 FRANKSTON H I GH SCHOOL VCE & VET SUBJECT LIST SUBJECT DESCRIPTION VCE VET VCE Mathematical Methods This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Mathematics - Specialist This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Media This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Music Performance This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ Music Performance This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ Music Sound Production This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Outdoor and Environmental Studies Units 3 & 4 can only be taken as part of a Year 11 VCE program. Students who studied Units 1 & 2 as part of their Year 10 studies must submit an Expression of Interest form to apply to study Units 3 & 4 (Year 12) as part of their Year 11 program. ✕ VCE Philosophy ✕ VCE Physical Education ✕ VCE Physics This is a subject that requires students to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ Plumbing This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Product Design and Technology This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Psychology ✕ Screen & Media – Multimedia This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ Sport and Recreation VCE Students who successfully gain a place in this subject will complete their VET at Frankston High School (part of normal timetable). ✕ VCE Structured Workplace Learning Recognition - SWLR This subject provides students with credit for Units 1 & 2. It can be selected as a part of a Year 12 program and students will be enrolled in Units 3 & 4 Industry and Enterprise. Students must also be studying a VET subject. ✕ Tourism This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ VCE Visual Communication Design This is a subject that requires a student to undertake and satisfactorily complete Units 1 & 2 prior to undertaking Units 3 & 4. ✕ The following VCE subjects can be selected by Year 12 students without having studied Units 1 & 2 in Year 11: VCE Art Creative Practice, VCE Biology, VCE Business Management, VCE Drama, VCE Environmental Science, VCE History: Revolutions, VCE Food Studies, VCE Geography, VCE Health and Human Development, VCE Legal Studies, VCE Literature, VCE Philosophy, VCE Physical Education, VCE Psychology, VCE Structured Workplace Learning Recognition, VET Sport and Recreation (this option is only available if students study it as part of their VCE program at Frankston High School).

PART 2 VCE SEN I OR SCHOOL HANDBOOK 19 The Arts VCE Art Creative Practice 20 VCE Drama 24 VCE Media 26 VCE Music 28 VCE Visual Communication Design 32 CONTENTS

PART 2 VCE 20 FRANKSTON H I GH SCHOOL VCE Art Creative Practice (previously known as Art) Career Advice Art is an integral part of life and contributes to a progressive society. Artworks and visual language are a potent and dynamic means to communicate personal experiences and ideas, and cultural values, beliefs and viewpoints on experiences and issues in contemporary society. In the study of VCE Art Creative Practice, research and investigation inform art making. Through the study of artworks, the practices of artists and their role in society, students develop their individual art practice, and communicate ideas and meaning using a range of materials, techniques and processes. In the practice of Making and Responding, students develop their skills in critical and creative thinking, innovation, problem-solving and risk-taking. By combining a focused study of artworks, art practice and practical art making, students recognise the interplay between research, art practice and the analysis and interpretation of art works. This study provides students with an informed context to support an awareness of art as a tool for cultural, social and personal communication, and the stimulus and inspiration to develop their art practice. VCE Art Creative Practice focuses on self-directed learning, creative and critical thinking, and creative problem-solving. The study helps students to develop transferable 21st-century skills that are highly valued in many areas of employment. Organisations increasingly seek employees who demonstrate work-related creativity and innovative thinking and who understand diversity. This study offers a number of opportunities for students to develop employability skills and is suited to students who are interested in pathways beyond school that lead to tertiary studies, vocational education, or employment. A course of study in VCE Art Creative Practice can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of artistic and creative practice as well as broader areas in creative industries and cultural institutions, and diverse fields that use skills inherent in the subject. The four components of the Creative Practice are interrelated and iterative. The components do not operate in a set sequence that privileges one or another over the others. The student can begin with any component and interact with combinations of the components in a dynamic and creative experience.

PART 2 VCE SEN I OR SCHOOL HANDBOOK 21 Year 11 – Units 1 & 2 UNIT 1: INTERPRETING ARTWORKS AND EXPLORING THE CREATIVE PRACTICE In Unit 1 students use Experiential learning in Making and Responding to explore ideas using the Creative Practice. As the artist and audience, students consider their connection to artworks, and how their communication of ideas and presentation of artworks challenge, shape and influence viewer or audience perspectives. They focus on the making of art and examine how artists communicate ideas and meaning in artworks. They examine artists in different societies, cultures and historical periods and develop their own interpretations and viewpoints about the meanings and messages of artworks. They explore how artists create new ways of thinking and representation, while developing their own art practice. Students explore the practices of artists who have been inspired by ideas relating to personal identity. They study at least three artists and at least one artwork from each of the selected artists. Through their analysis and interpretation students learn how to formulate and substantiate personal opinions about artworks. Students apply the Structural Lens and the Personal Lens to analyse and interpret the meanings and messages of artworks and to document the reflection of their own ideas throughout their art practice. Students learn about the components of the Creative Practice and explore areas of personal interest to develop a series of visual responses. They use a range of materials, techniques, processes and art forms to create a body of experimental work in response to their research of the practices of artists and their personal observations of artworks. They experiment with a range of approaches to develop technical skills and promote creative thinking through the study of both traditional and contemporary art practices. They are guided through an Experiential learning process to research, explore, experiment and develop, and to evaluate and reflect upon their use of the Creative Practice. UNIT 2: INTERPRETING ARTWORKS AND DEVELOPING THE CREATIVE PRACTICE In Unit 2 students use Inquiry learning to investigate the artistic and collaborative practices of artists. They use the Cultural Lens, and the other Interpretive Lenses as appropriate, to examine artworks from different periods of time and cultures, and to explore the different ways that artists interpret and communicate social and personal ideas in artworks Students explore the collaborative practices of artists and use the Creative Practice to make and present artworks. They develop visual responses based on their investigations, exploring the way historical and contemporary cultural contexts, ideas and approaches have influenced the artworks and the practices of the artists they investigate, as well as their own art practice. Artworks can acknowledge specific ideas or beliefs, or commemorate people, institutions, social movements and events. They can reinforce the intentions and purpose of a social, cultural or community group, or they can challenge social or cultural attitudes and assumptions. Throughout Unit 2, students examine the importance of the social and cultural contexts of artworks and analyse the varying social functions that art can serve. They also investigate how artworks can be created as forms of expression for specific social and cultural contexts. Students research historical and contemporary artworks and explore diverse and alternative approaches to making and presenting artworks. While the focus of this unit is on the Cultural Lens, students should continue to apply aspects of the Structural and Personal Lenses where relevant in the analysis and interpretation of artworks and in the documentation of their art practice. Assessment Suitable tasks for assessment in Units 1 and 2 may be selected from the following: an extended written response, short-answer responses supported by visual references, an annotated visual report, a digital presentation, an oral presentation. Students will be required to provide visual responses that demonstrate the use of the Creative Practice, collaboration and the exploration of personal ideas related to social and cultural contexts. Students will be required to complete documentation of the Creative Practice, in the form of critical annotations, that presents explorations in selected art forms, and demonstrates the development of the student’s collaborative practice. They will provide a critique of the development of personal ideas, directions, explorations, visual language, technical skills, processes and artworks. CONTENTS

PART 2 VCE 22 FRANKSTON H I GH SCHOOL Year 12 – Units 3 & 4 UNIT 3: INVESTIGATION, IDEAS, ARTWORKS AND THE CREATIVE PRACTICE In this unit students use Inquiry and Project-based learning as starting points to develop a Body of Work. They explore ideas and experiment with materials, techniques and processes using the Creative Practice. The research of historical and contemporary artists is integral to students’ use of the Creative Practice and informs the basis of their investigation. Students also investigate the issues that may arise from the artworks they view and discuss, or those evolving from the practice of the artist. Unit 3 commences with students researching the practice of a selected artist as the starting point to develop a finished artwork. The finished artwork will contribute to the Body of Work developed over Units 3 and 4. In Unit 3, the Interpretive Lenses are used in Making and Responding throughout the students’ art practice. Students apply the Interpretive Lenses to researched artworks and in their reflective analysis and evaluation of their use of the Creative Practice. They use critical and creative thinking skills to explore and develop ideas, and experiment with materials, techniques and processes. UNIT 4: INTERPRETING, RESOLVING AND PRESENTING ARTWORKS AND THE CREATIVE PRACTICE In Unit 4 students continue to develop their art practice through Project-based and Inquiry learning as their research and exploration continues to support the development of their Body of Work. Throughout their research students study the practices of selected historical and contemporary artists to inform their own art practice. They use the Interpretive Lenses to analyse, compare and interpret the meanings and messages of artworks produced by the artists they study. Students also apply the Interpretive Lenses throughout the Creative Practice to resolve and refine their Body of Work. Students continue to build upon the ideas begun in Unit 3 and present a critique of their use of the Creative Practice. They reflect on the feedback from their critique to further refine and resolve a Body of Work that demonstrates their use of the Creative Practice and the realisation of their personal ideas. The students present their Body of Work to an audience accompanied by documentation of their use of the Creative Practice. In Unit 4, Areas of Study 1 and 2 are taught concurrently. The critique in Area of Study 1 takes place before the resolution and presentation of the Body of Work. Documentation of the Creative Practice is carried throughout Areas of Study 1 and 2 in the refinement, resolution and presentation of the student’s Body of Work. The students’ use of the Creative Practice involves both Making and Responding and is underpinned by the Interpretive Lenses. Students use the Interpretive Lenses to analyse and interpret the meanings and messages of artworks created by the artists they study and to investigate the practices used to create them. Applied together, these Interpretive Lenses enable students to appreciate how an artwork may contain different aspects and layers of meaning and to acknowledge the validity of diverse interpretations. Students view a range of artworks in different contexts and interpret the ideas and meanings communicated in the artworks. Assessment Production of a documented Body of Work that presents explorations and the development of personal ideas within selected art forms, using the Creative Practice and including reflective annotations. A critique of the development, refinement and resolution of personal concepts, ideas, directions, explorations and the use of visual language in artworks. Production of a Body of Work that resolves personal concepts, ideas and explorations using the Creative Practice, including the presentation of one or more finished artworks that resolve the student’s intentions. The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-ofyear examination. The examination will contribute 30 per cent to the study score.

PART 2 VCE SEN I OR SCHOOL HANDBOOK 23 CONTENTS

PART 2 VCE 24 FRANKSTON H I GH SCHOOL VCE Drama Career Advice Through drama you can become anyone, anywhere, at anytime. By understanding drama you can learn to understand anyone, anywhere, anytime. Plays often capture the essence of a culture or a group within that culture. They reveal the attitudes and opinions of their day. It helps with building self-confidence, speaking in public, and developing interpersonal skills. Drama will help you to be more aware of how your physical presentation can affect the way people see you. Students develop an appreciation of drama as an art form through their work as solo and ensemble performers, and engagement with professional contemporary drama practice. They develop skills of communication, criticism, aesthetic understanding and aesthetic control. VCE Drama equips students with knowledge, skills and confidence to communicate as individuals and collaboratively in a broad range of social, cultural and work-related contexts. The study of drama may provide pathways to training and tertiary study in acting, dramaturgy, theatre-making, script writing, communication and drama criticism. Visit our careers website to discover the range of occupations related to drama. Year 11 – Units 1 & 2 UNIT 1: INTRODUCING PERFORMANCE STYLES In this unit students’ study three or more performance styles from a range of social, historical and cultural contexts. They examine drama traditions of ritual and storytelling to devise performances that go beyond recreation and/or representation of real life as it is lived. This unit focuses on creating, presenting and analysing a devised solo and/or ensemble performance that includes real or imagined characters and is based on stimulus material that reflects personal, cultural and/ or community experiences and stories. This unit also involves analysis of a student’s own performance work and a work by professional drama performers. Students apply play-making techniques to shape and give meaning to their performance. They manipulate expressive and performance skills in the creation and presentation of characters and develop awareness and understanding of how characters are portrayed in a range of performance styles. They document the processes they use as they explore a range of stimulus material, and experiment with production areas, dramatic elements, conventions and performance styles. UNIT 2: AUSTRALIAN IDENTITY In this unit students study aspects of Australian identity evident in contemporary drama practice. This may also involve exploring the work of selected drama practitioners and associated performance styles. This unit focuses on the use and documentation of the processes involved in constructing a devised solo or ensemble performance. Students create, present and analyse a performance based on a person, an event, an issue, a place, an artwork, a text and/or an icon from a contemporary or historical Australian context. In creating the performance, students use stimulus material that allows them to explore an aspect or aspects of Australian identity. They examine selected performance styles and explore the associated conventions. Students further develop their knowledge of the conventions of transformation of character, time and place, the application of symbol, and how these conventions may be manipulated to create meaning in performance and the use of dramatic elements and production areas. Students analyse their own performance work as well as undertaking an analysis of a performance of an Australian work, where possible, by professional actors. Assessment All assessments at Units 1 & 2 are school-based. Suitable tasks for assessment in this unit may be selected from the following: demonstrate the use of play-making techniques to devise and develop a solo and/or ensemble drama works based on stories and/or characters, analyse the drama work created and performed, write an analysis in response to structured questions, document the processes used to create and develop stories and characters in drama.

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